How to organize your localizable strings using POEditor’s tagging system

Today we will show you how easy it is to use POEditor’s tagging system among your localization projects. Tags are a simple solution for organizing terms, and they come in handy both during translation and on export. Some situations in which you would care to make use of tags would be:

  • When you want to manage localization projects with similar translations in the same POEditor translation project.
  • When translating terms from several platforms within the same project. With tags, you can keep track of each platform’s set of terms so you can export them accordingly when the translations are ready.
  • When having different versions of the same terms within a project. Tags will help you follow each version, to translate them selectively and export them as such.

How to set tags in POEditor

There are two ways in which you can tag terms in a localization project:

  • Import FileOn import
    While on a project page, go to Import Terms > Advanced Options. After selecting a language file, you can add tags for the terms to be imported. You can add tags to all the terms in the file, to the new terms (which are in the file to be imported and not in the project), or to the obsolete ones (which are in the project but not in the file to be imported).

  • Add tags in View TermsDuring translation
    While on a project page, go to View or Add terms and select the terms you want to tag by checking the boxes on their left. In the dropdown menu at the bottom of the page, choose Add Tags to Selection and write the name of the tag in the box next to the menu. You can use an already existing tag or add a new one.

Filtering by tags

Again, two situations:

  • Filter by tagsDuring translation
    To clearly view all the terms in a certain category on a language page, just select the desired tag from the top left drop-down menu and have your set of terms exclusively displayed.

  • Export by tagsOn export
    While on a language page, click on Export > Advanced Options and select the filters you want to apply for export. The result will be a file containing only the pairs of terms and translations which have been tagged with the selected tag(s).

We have seen tags used in many creative ways by our users, so by no means should you limit yourselves to the examples given in this article. Whether you want to sort your terms by date, platform or anything else, using tags will help you neatly organize your sets of terms for a smooth localization process.

Update February 2015: On import, if you choose to overwrite the translations, you now have available the option of tagging the terms which have had their translations modified.

POEditor offers academic discounts for software translation projects

Academic discounts and other goodies

Today we’re going to tell you all about our special academic discount program. We know that professionals entering the localization industry come from many different fields (marketing, international studies, language studies and so on) and that their number, as their need for technical accommodation, is growing by the day. Thus, for educational purposes, POEditor developed the academic program. It consists in a 50% discount on all subscription plans for academic institutions and individuals, and it is aimed at encouraging hands-on practice for those in the academia hoping to achieve a better understanding of what the process of software localization entails, and how the commercial translation environment looks like.

Students and professors can get familiar with cloud localization by using the POEditor platform, benefiting from unrestrained access to all of its features, at a privileged half price.

Are you eligible?

All that is necessary to qualify for our special academic discount program is to be a part of the academia, as a student, teacher, or researcher. Verification is done by email address, so you will need an educational email address matching the school’s domain name with which to register (for free) on POEditor.

How do you purchase?

To benefit from our special academic discount program, you will need to contact us by e-mail, specifying which address you used to register. After checking that the requirements are met, we will provide a unique link that will get you 50% off on your chosen subscription plan.

POEditor and the localization of Open Source Projects

Translating OS projects with POEditor

POEditor believes in the Open Source movement and supports it, offering free localization services for all Open Source projects. You can translate Open Source projects without using up strings from your account’s limit. All you have to do is request POEditor’s approval for such a localization project, if the software you want to translate is an OSI approved Open Source software. You can find out how to make the request here.

Remember, when you fill out a request for an Open Source Project, you have to prove that your project is Open Source by providing the type of OSI approved license, a project description and a link to your project page.

What are Open Source projects?

Open Source software is software that can be freely used, changed, and shared (in modified or unmodified form) by anyone. Open Source software is developed and distributed under licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is a global non-profit that supports and promotes the Open Source movement. Among other things, OSI maintains the Open Source Definition, and a list of licenses that comply with that definition.

Congratulations POEditor, it’s a blog!

Yes, we know! We should have started a blog years ago, but we were too busy making our translation software great. Now our team is getting bigger and we decided it’s time to communicate more. So here we are! We would really love to hear what you think about the service, or whatever you guys think we should be implementing next, before we start bragging about POEditor’s cool features. You can use our Twitter, Google+ and Facebook accounts for comments and suggestions, and for more information, see https://poeditor.com.

Here’s to a good start!