Automating your localization workflow with POEditor API – Quick Guide

Whenever you get the chance to automate something to avoid repetitive manual work, go for it, because it will save you a lot of time and boost your productivity. That being said, let’s cut to the chase: the purpose of this article is to show you how to automate your localization workflow with the POEditor API. For this, we’ll go through a simple step by step guide. You’ll learn how to send your language data to POEditor and how to pull the translated work back into your software.

Knowledge of a programming language is required (any will do), but we’ll focus on the requests you need to make to the API.

All the information about the API is in the API Reference.

Before starting the actual work, get an API token from your POEditor account. You can find it in Account Settings > API Access.

Project setup

The first step is to create a project. Note that you need to do this only once and that you can also use the interface. It’s probably faster anyway.

Create a project:

curl -X POST https://poeditor.com/api/ \
-d api_token="e9eccebeccfr9wed638eb35f5e2d5600" \
-d action="create_project" \
-d name="Quick Guide"

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Crowdsourcing translation for a localization project: how to manage everything

So there’s a software product you want to localize into some languages, and you decided on crowdsourcing translation to achieve this.

If you’re working with any of these localization files, you can easily set up a crowdsourcing project at POEditor. Just create an account, and you’ll have access immediately to awesome localization management features that will automate your workflow.

This article is an overview of the steps to creating a crowdsourced translation project and the essential features to manage it.

A public join page for crowdsourcing translators - POEditor localization platform
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Translator’s guide to software localization

If you want to help with the localization of a software product using the POEditor translation platform, but you’re not quite sure what you should do, you can browse this article to gain insights into how our collaborative interface works.

How to join a localization project

Joining depends on the project type. If the project is private, the project owner or an administrator must add you, and you’ll be informed by email of this. If it is a crowdsourced localization project, you’ll have to go to the public join page and select the language(s) you want to contribute to.

Join public localization project - POEditor translation management platform
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How to integrate Slack or HipChat into your software localization workflow

Connectivity is essential to a flexibile and efficient localization workflow. Being connected to your team at all times and also being connected to the constant flow of events during the localization process, you can react on the spot whenever something needs attention, increasing productivity and saving a lot of resources on the way. With this in mind, and somehow as a logical step to offering you a better solution for collaborative localization, we’ve decided to add two more options to the list of integrations available with the POEditor localization management platform- Slack and HipChat.

The walkthroughs below will help you connect your POEditor account to Slack or to HipChat. Make sure you log in both to the POEditor localization platform and to your preferred communication service before you begin.
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How to get professional human translation services for your software localization project

The POEditor localization management platform is mainly designed as a productivity tool for localization teams that want to use their own translators in the process of localizing software strings.

Despite this, we know that not everyone who reaches our localization platform has translators to assign to their l10n projects, or a community to crowdsource translation. For them, we provide quick access to professional translation services. Following the steps described below, you can easily order translations for your software localization project, directly from your POEditor account.

Step 1: Go to the Translation Orders page, choose your values and get a quote

In the Project page, click on the Translation Orders button to reach the New Order page. Here, select your desired values, then press Get Quote to find out what the translation price is.
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How to translate WordPress themes and plugins: localization management with the POEditor plugin

With POEditor’s localization plugin for WordPress, you can manage the translation of your WordPress language files more efficiently, all from within your WP dashboard. After downloading and installing the POEditor WordPress translation plugin according to the instructions in the Installation tab, follow this step by step guide to set up your localization workflow.

How to manage the WordPress localization workflow

Assign local language file to translation project - POEditor localization management platform

  • Step 1: Go to your POEditor account, click on your username in the navigation bar and then go to Account Settings > API Access. Generate an API token and copy it to the POEditor plugin in your WordPress account, where it says POEditor API KEY. A page will be generated, listing all the software localization projects in your POEditor account (if you have any) and your local WordPress language files.
  • Step 2: Click on Create project in the POEditor plugin to start a new translation project. A corresponding project will be created in your account on the POEditor localization platform.
  • Step 3: Add a language in the POEditor plugin to the newly created project, and then link a WordPress language file to it by clicking on Assign file. 
  • Step 4: Press Export to send the terms from your local WordPress language file (.po or .pot) to your project on the POEditor software localization platform.

Having sent the terms from your local WordPress .po or .pot file to the POEditor localization platform, the translation process can begin. From the POEditor interface, you can assign contributors to each language to collaboratively translate the terms, or you can make the translation project public on POEditor, so volunteer translators can self-enroll to languages in your WordPress localization project.

If you want to add more languages to the translation project, you can repeat step 3. In case you don’t have a corresponding language file in your WordPress account to assign to the language you’ve added, you can use the POEditor plugin to create a new .po (and a matching .mo) file in the desired location.

If you use the POEditor localization platform instead of the plugin to add languages (or projects), just click on Refresh online projects list and they will appear in the POEditor WP plugin.

  • Step 5: Bring back to WordPress the localized languages from the POEditor localization platform. You can do this at any time, regardless of the translation’s progress, by clicking in the POEditor plugin on Import (for individual languages) or Import all (to fetch all the linked languages in the translation project).

Following these simple steps, you will be able to streamline the language file management in the process of translating WordPress themes and plugins with the POEditor localization platform.

What each button in the POEditor WP translation plugin does

To make everything crystal clear, below is a list of the buttons in the POEditor plugin, with short descriptions of the actions they perform.

Change API Key: allows the changing of the API Key in the POEditor plugin, POEditor WordPress translation plugin - Main pagein case it was changed in the connected POEditor account.

Reset plugin: deletes all the local file assignments and detaches the WordPress installation from the POEditor accont.

Refresh online projects list: updates in the plugin the list of all the projects and languages in the connected POEditor account, along with their progress.

Assign file: links a language in a POEditor translation project to a local WordPress language file.

Import: brings to WordPress the .po and .mo files (containing both terms and translations) from the POEditor localization platform.

Export: sends the terms from the assigned WordPress language file to the corresponding POEditor localization project (without touching the existing translations in the project).

Sync: sends the terms and the translations from the assigned WordPress language file to the corresponding language in the POEditor localization project, overwriting existing translations.

Import all: brings the .po and .mo files for all the languages to WordPress, from the POEditor localization platform.

Export all: sends the terms from all the assigned WordPress language files to the corresponding POEditor localization project (without touching the existing translations in the project).

Sync all: sends the terms and the translations from all the assigned WordPress language files to the corresponding languages in the POEditor localization project, overwriting existing translations.

Add language to: creates a new language in the translation project on the POEditor localization platform.

Create project: creates a project in the connected POEditor account.

Rescan for language files: searches WordPress for .po and .pot language files.

Congratulations! You now know everything about POEditor’s translation plugin for WordPress, and should be able to effortlessly integrate the POEditor localization management platform into your workflow. However, if there is anything you’d like to further discuss about the POEditor plugin, don’t hesitate to drop us a line in the comments or using the contact form.

 

Manage the payment of your localization project effortlessly with POEditor’s alternative payer system

Most of the time, the roles in a software localization workflow are very specialized, divided according to specific activities and tasks. Our experience with the localization industry has revealed that it’s not rare for companies to contact an agency to manage their software localization process. So they outsource it, but does the same apply for the payment for the localization services? Sometimes, even if a company does use an in-house localization team, the payment for the localization tools used in the translation process will still be managed by an Accounting Department. As you can see, the person with strings may not also be the one with the money.

So, to make sure the translation workflow suffers no disruption, we’ve come up with a payment management system that makes life easy for the person in charge of the financial aspect of the localization process.

How the Alternative Payer System Works

Our payment system was built with a simple premise in mind: the owner of a project managed with the localization platform POEditor may not be the same with the person handling the credit card that should be charged for that project. This is why a POEditor account owner can assign someone else to pay for his/her subscription. That person will have to be a POEditor user, and to explicitly accept this role. The alternative payer’s Billing section will have to be filled with the right billing details, and all the payments that will be made using them will have corresponding invoices sent to the alternative payer’s account.

How to Invite an Alternative Payer

To add an alternative payer to your POEditor account, just go to your Billing section and click on the link above My Billing Info that says “Invite Alternative Payer”.

An email will be sent to the specified email address to notify about the invitation. To accept it, the person will have to go to the Billing section in his/her POEditor account and confirm the role from there. A POEditor user can (simultaneously) become an alternative payer for as many POEditor accounts as desired,  and has the freedom to quit the alternative payer role at any time.

Localization managers, account managers, translation leads and so forth, rest assured! We never stop thinking about you and we’ve got your back on this. If you have suggestions about how we could make the translation interface more flexible for your specific needs, don’t be shy to send us your thoughts by using the contact form or by commenting below.

Webhooks: a Solution to Automate the Sync Between the POEditor Collaborative Translation Platform and GitHub or Bitbucket Repos

Lately, some users have been asking for a way to automate the synchronization between the POEditor localization platform and GitHub/Bitbucket repositories. Because we want to make them happy, we found a way to do this – webhooks. These “user-defined HTTP callbacks” can be used to trigger a certain sync in your repos. They can be called from anywhere, and can be maintained, modified and managed by any third-party users.

Preparing the webhook

To make use of a webhook, you first need to create a webhook URL. Find an example for GitHub here, and one for Bitbucket here.
After creating the webhook, you can add it to a GitHub or Bitbucket account so that events in the repos trigger terms (and translations) updates in a POEditor project.

Using webhooks with Bitbucket

To add a webhook to a Bitbucket account, just log on to it, go to Settings → Hooks, and select “POST” from the “Select a hook” dropdown menu. Then click on “Add hook” and introduce the webhook URL in the empty field. Whenever the repository changes, the webhook will be triggered to sync between the assigned language/project on POEditor and the file in the repo.

Using webhooks with Github

Adding a webhook to GitHub is also easy. Go to the account, click on Settings → Webhooks & Services → Add webhook, and add the webhook URL to the “Payload URL” field. Unlike in the case of Bitbucket webhooks, you can pick what kind of event(s) you want to trigger the webhook. It can be just the push event, individual events, or everything (any change in the repo).

So that’s that. The POEditor GitHub integration and Bitbucket integration are now faster than ever, because you have the choice to automatically send the updates in the repos to your localization projects managed on POEditor.

Update July 2015: It is now possible to use webhooks to export terms and translations from your POEditor localization project to your connected GitHub account. Please note that the export option can be triggered from anywhere, except GitHub.

 

Proofreading translations with the POEditor localization platform

When it comes to the translation part of a localization process, one of the most important aspects is proofreading the translations. Before exporting the localized strings back to your website, app or game, you will want to make sure they’ve been well adapted to their context and are, indeed, good to go. What’s the best way to achieve this? Assigning some proofreaders to your software localization project, of course.

In this post we will show you how our most recently implemented feature works. As usual, the POEditor translation interface makes things really simple.
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