Translate your app or website faster with multiple human translation orders

POEditor users have multiple options for translating their software strings. They can bring their own translators, crowdsource translations using public projects, use machine translation engines, or even opt for third party human translation services. The latter feature is provided in partnership with well-reputed human translation platforms in the industry.

Until recently, as a POEditor user, you had to access each localization project to order human translations for it. And you had to repeat this process for each language. Because our users made us aware they wish to accelerate this part of their workflow, we’ve made some small changes.

What’s new with the human translation order process

In essence, you can now place orders for any project in the same page, and can order as many translations as you want, at the same time.

Add human translation order - POEditor localization platform

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Machine translation in app and website localization

We can trace the idea of Machine Translation back to the 17th century, in the work of René Descartes. But it’s the 1970s which saw Machine Translation used for its actual purpose, initially in institutions like the European Commission, and later at big corporations. The advent of the Internet sped up the evolution of MT significantly and resulted in advanced technologies like today’s Statistical Machine Translation.

In software localization, we can use Machine Translation (or Automatic Translation) in a number of processes.

Google and Bing machine translation engines for automatic translation- POEdtior localization platform
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Free localization with the POEditor translation platform

The online localization platform POEditor is free to use to translate software projects collaboratively in the following circumstances:

With Free Accounts

If you register to the POEditor, you get an account with a Free plan by default. The free account can accomodate software localization projects summing up to 1000 strings, which is usually enough to translate a small app or a WordPress theme into a few languages.

Also, you can use your free account to contribute without any limitation to localization projects owned by other users. The strings you translate for others are counted against their account.

Free plans, like all the other POEditor plans, can host an unlimited number of projects, languages and contributors. But, unlike accounts with paid plans, free accounts don’t come with a Translation Memory feature.
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How to track the translation progress in a software localization project with POEditor’s rich statistics

Whether you’re translating something with a few strings, like a theme or an app, or dealing with something with a zillion strings, like a big website, there’s one thing that will always come in handy to the localization manager: statistics.

Statistics can be helpful for many things, among which evaluating the general translation progress of the software localization project and calculating fees for translators.

The POEditor localization management platform comes with two categories of stats: for project owners and administrators, and for contributors.

What stats pages look like

At the top of every Statistics page, some general information about the localization project is available, such as the project name, the amount of terms in it, and the total of words and characters these terms sum up. Some users can see more information in this area, as a result of their role in the localization project and the Stats page they are on.Date Range Picker (Statistics) - POEditor localization platform
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Recovering translations with the History module

The History module is one of the features that makes translating software strings with the POEditor localization management platform a safe and easy process. What the History module does is store translations that are one hour old in a database, so that they can later be recovered individually (with the History link), or in bulk, for a particular language (using the Recover from history feature). Below we will describe how the History module works.

Consulting previous translation versions for individual termsHistory link (Language page) - POEditor localization management platform

In any Languge page, you can find History links next to each previously translated string (remember – the translations must’ve been one hour old to be recorded). If you click on one of these links, you will see all the translations that have been made in that language for the corresponding term, as well as who made the translation and when.
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Updating translations in labels-based software localization projects

If you want to translate an app that uses language files such as .strings, .xliff, .resx, .xml or .properties with the software localization management platform POEditor, it’s very likely your localization process will be a little different than if you were using any of the other supported language files. This is because these language files contain labels.

As a developer/localization manager/someone else handling a labels-based project with POEditor, you will start your software localization process by importing strings from a language file and setting a Default Reference Language.
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How to translate WordPress themes and plugins using the POEditor localization plugin

With POEditor’s localization plugin for WordPress, you can manage the translation of your WordPress language files more efficiently, all from within your WP dashboard. After downloading and installing the POEditor WordPress translation plugin according to the instructions in the Installation tab, follow this step by step guide to set up your localization workflow.

How to manage the WordPress localization workflow

Assign local language file to translation project - POEditor localization management platform

  • Step 1: Go to your POEditor account, click on your username in the navigation bar and then go to Account Settings > API Access. Generate an API token and copy it to the POEditor plugin in your WordPress account, where it says POEditor API KEY. A page will be generated, listing all the software localization projects in your POEditor account (if you have any) and your local WordPress language files.
  • Step 2: Click on Create project in the POEditor plugin to start a new translation project. A corresponding project will be created in your account on the POEditor localization platform.
  • Step 3: Add a language in the POEditor plugin to the newly created project, and then link a WordPress language file to it by clicking on Assign file. 
  • Step 4: Press Export to send the terms from your local WordPress language file (.po or .pot) to your project on the POEditor software localization platform.

Having sent the terms from your local WordPress .po or .pot file to the POEditor localization platform, the translation process can begin. From the POEditor interface, you can assign contributors to each language to collaboratively translate the terms, or you can make the translation project public on POEditor, so volunteer translators can self-enroll to languages in your WordPress localization project.

If you want to add more languages to the translation project, you can repeat step 3. In case you don’t have a corresponding language file in your WordPress account to assign to the language you’ve added, you can use the POEditor plugin to create a new .po (and a matching .mo) file in the desired location.

If you use the POEditor localization platform instead of the plugin to add languages (or projects), just click on Refresh online projects list and they will appear in the POEditor WP plugin.

  • Step 5: Bring back to WordPress the localized languages from the POEditor localization platform. You can do this at any time, regardless of the translation’s progress, by clicking in the POEditor plugin on Import (for individual languages) or Import all (to fetch all the linked languages in the translation project).

Following these simple steps, you will be able to streamline the language file management in the process of translating WordPress themes and plugins with the POEditor localization platform.

What each button in the POEditor WP translation plugin does

To make everything crystal clear, below is a list of the buttons in the POEditor plugin, with short descriptions of the actions they perform.

Change API Key: allows the changing of the API Key in the POEditor plugin, POEditor WordPress translation plugin - Main pagein case it was changed in the connected POEditor account.

Reset plugin: deletes all the local file assignments and detaches the WordPress installation from the POEditor accont.

Refresh online projects list: updates in the plugin the list of all the projects and languages in the connected POEditor account, along with their progress.

Assign file: links a language in a POEditor translation project to a local WordPress language file.

Import: brings to WordPress the .po and .mo files (containing both terms and translations) from the POEditor localization platform.

Export: sends the terms from the assigned WordPress language file to the corresponding POEditor localization project (without touching the existing translations in the project).

Sync: sends the terms and the translations from the assigned WordPress language file to the corresponding language in the POEditor localization project, overwriting existing translations.

Import all: brings the .po and .mo files for all the languages to WordPress, from the POEditor localization platform.

Export all: sends the terms from all the assigned WordPress language files to the corresponding POEditor localization project (without touching the existing translations in the project).

Sync all: sends the terms and the translations from all the assigned WordPress language files to the corresponding languages in the POEditor localization project, overwriting existing translations.

Add language to: creates a new language in the translation project on the POEditor localization platform.

Create project: creates a project in the connected POEditor account.

Rescan for language files: searches WordPress for .po and .pot language files.

Congratulations! You now know everything about POEditor’s translation plugin for WordPress, and should be able to effortlessly integrate the POEditor localization management platform into your workflow. However, if there is anything you’d like to further discuss about the POEditor plugin, don’t hesitate to drop us a line in the comments or using the contact form.

 

Complete localization projects faster using POEditor’s Translation Memory System

To make a localization process faster, there are aspects of it that can be automated. Translation is one of these aspects and even though it has been proven in numerous instances that machine translation cannot compare to human translation, there exists what is called Translation Memory, which combines the human touch with machine power to simplify the translator’s work.

How the POEditor Translation Memory works

Each time a user translates a term, the translation gets stored immediately in the TM database. The TM database stores one translation per user for each term, which gets updated each time the user edits it in the interface. In case different users add different translations for the same term, they all get stored in the Translation Memory database. If there is more than one translation variant for a term in the Translation Memory, the TM will generate of list of suggestion, so the users can select the most appropriate one. The TM will always list the translations according to how many times they were used.

How to use the Translation Memory with the POEditor localization platform

There are two ways in which translators can use the Translation Memory System: either in the language page, using the TM Suggestions, or by going to the Translation Memory page (look for the Translation Memory button in the side menu of the language page), where you can bulk load translations from the TM database.

Using Translation Memory Suggestions

For TM Suggestion to be displayed in the language pages of a POEditor localization project, they need to be activated in Account Settings by the project owner.

After switching on the TM suggestions, all the contributors will be able to see them under the empty translation fields, if any appropriate results are found in the database. Clicking the “Use” button next to a suggestion will copy it to the translation field.

Translation Memory Suggestions - POEditor Localization Platform

If the contributor has a Reference Language set, the Translation Memory will also search through the database for translations done in that language to propose TM suggestions.

Bulk loading translations from the Translation Memory database

Pressing the Translation Memory button in the side menu of the language page, you will be taken to the Translation Memory page. Press “Start searching”, and the system will start looking in the database for translations relevant to the untranslated terms. When it’s done, you will get a list with all the terms and the translations found in the TM database. You will be able to choose the variant that you find appropriate, if there are more than one, or to choose to completely ignore the translation(s) found for a particular term. By default, all the translations the TM finds are pre-selected, so you can easily load them in bulk in the language page by pressing “Use translations”.

POEditor localization platform - Translation Memory

Translation Memory Privacy

Each paid account has its own Translation Memory database. Because we take privacy seriously, you have to expressly grant your contributors or admins access to the Translation Memory, by going to Account Settings and switching Translation Memory Access to YES. Also, if you want people working on your software localization project to see the suggestions from the Translation Memory database, you will have to switch TM Suggestions to ON.

All the translations made for a localization project by a contributor belong both to the contributor and to the project owner, and are stored in both their Translation Memory databases, if they both have paid accounts.

Manage the payment of your localization project effortlessly with POEditor’s alternative payer system

Most of the time, the roles in a software localization workflow are very specialized, divided according to specific activities and tasks. Our experience with the localization industry has revealed that it’s not rare for companies to contact an agency to manage their software localization process. So they outsource it, but does the same apply for the payment for the localization services? Sometimes, even if a company does use an in-house localization team, the payment for the localization tools used in the translation process will still be managed by an Accounting Department. As you can see, the person with strings may not also be the one with the money.

So, to make sure the translation workflow suffers no disruption, we’ve come up with a payment management system that makes life easy for the person in charge of the financial aspect of the localization process.

How the Alternative Payer System Works

Our payment system was built with a simple premise in mind: the owner of a project managed with the localization platform POEditor may not be the same with the person handling the credit card that should be charged for that project. This is why a POEditor account owner can assign someone else to pay for his/her subscription. That person will have to be a POEditor user, and to explicitly accept this role. The alternative payer’s Billing section will have to be filled with the right billing details, and all the payments that will be made using them will have corresponding invoices sent to the alternative payer’s account.

How to Invite an Alternative Payer

To add an alternative payer to your POEditor account, just go to your Billing section and click on the link above My Billing Info that says “Invite Alternative Payer”.

An email will be sent to the specified email address to notify about the invitation. To accept it, the person will have to go to the Billing section in his/her POEditor account and confirm the role from there. A POEditor user can (simultaneously) become an alternative payer for as many POEditor accounts as desired,  and has the freedom to quit the alternative payer role at any time.

Localization managers, account managers, translation leads and so forth, rest assured! We never stop thinking about you and we’ve got your back on this. If you have suggestions about how we could make the translation interface more flexible for your specific needs, don’t be shy to send us your thoughts by using the contact form or by commenting below.