Bitbucket commit, now available with POEditor integration

A Bitbucket push method for our integration is something we’ve all been expecting for years.

Up until recently, the Bitbucket API did not support this method, unlike GitHub and GitLab. But, thanks to many Bitbucket users asking for it, your preferred code hosting platform has finally added this feature!

Upon hearing the news, we’ve immediately made it our main priority to update the Bitbucket integration. So, now, we’re happy to announce that you can export translations from your POEditor localization projects to your repos with just a few clicks.

We’ve also updated the Webhooks generator to reflect the implementation of the commit.

Bitbucket commit - POEditor localization platform

If you’re new to the Bitbucket integration, you can learn how to set it up here. More information about how to manage localization files between POEditor and Bitbucket is available here.

Cheers to all of you who took the time to push for this change! Don’t be shy to let us know if you have any feedback.

 

Translation options with the localization platform POEditor

According to the nature of your project and the localization resources you have available, you can choose to translate strings with POEditor using one or a combination of the translation options below.

Assigning contributors to specific languages

Whether your company has its own translation department, you collaborate with a translation agency or you have some friends willing to help with the translation, this option is for you. You know exactly who will be translating the project into what language.

Add contributor - POEditor localization management platform

Assigning a contributor to a language in a POEditor project is easy. There’s an ‘Add contributor’ button in the Project page for each project language, and one in each Language page. Click on one of these buttons and type in the name and email of the person you want to assign to the language. They will receive an invitation to join your localization project, which will allow them to start translating right away.

You can add contributors to a localization project via API also.

Human translation orders

If your project needs to be localized into a language quickly and professionally, and you don’t have a translator to assign to your project, the human translation order module is what you’re looking for.

Human translation module - POEditor localization management platform

 

At POEditor, we offer an integrated translation order system, which allows you to seamlessly send strings to professional human translators. Once the translations are completed, the localized strings are sent back to your POEditor account and you can import them to your project with a few clicks. No need to send localization files back and forth, or for any external accounts/keys/credits.

Sounds easy? It is.

Crowdsourced translation (community translation)

Have an active community, who you would trust with localizing your project? That’s where public projects come in.

After you make your localization project public in Project Settings, you can share a link to its public join page, where anyone can volunteer to translate into one or more languages.

A public join page for a crowsourced localization project

There are ways to control the access to your crowdsourced localization project. For new contributors, check the options available in Project Settings > Advanced Settings. For current contributors, see the Contributors page. More information about public projects is available here.

Machine Translation

For pseudolocalization purposes, or for the translation of short, simple strings, you can always opt to use machine translation engines. We offer two vendors for automatic translation, Google and Microsoft Translate.

To access the Automatic Translation feature, click the button with the same name in any Language page.

As handy as it can be in some cases, and as much as it may have advanced over the years, we would advise you to use human translation for production environments.

Have you decided upon the localization strategy you are going to use for your project? Feel free share your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

Angular 2 Localization: How to Translate App Strings

Translating Angular 2 apps can be simple. All you need is an .xmb file with your source language from your Angular 2 app and a POEditor account. The rest is just a matter of choosing the localization strategy which best suit your needs, from the ones our localization management platform has to offer.Angular 2 localization

How to set up an Angular 2 translation project

Setting up the translation project for your Angular 2 app is as simple as 1, 2, 3:

Step 1. Create the project in your account and add the source language and the languages desired for localization.

Step 2. Import terms to the project and translations in the source language from the .xmb file. Do this using the Import Terms button in the project page (don’t forget to choose to ‘Also import translations in…’ your source language).

Step 3. Set a Default Reference Language in Project Settings.

Angular 2 xmb import

After going through these simple steps, your project is set and you can proceed to choosing which way you want to translate your Angular 2 strings.

Localization strategies to choose from

The POEditor localization platform lets you combine various ways of translating strings.

You can use (unlimited) in-house translators (added as contributors), order human translations from one of our partners, crowdsource translations from your community (using public projects), as well as use Machine Translation (Google/Microsoft).

Because we wanted to make things as straightforward as possible, everything is manageable from within your POEditor account. So, you won’t need any external accounts/keys/credits to make use of these translation options.

How to automate the localization process

For automating translation, I’ve already mentioned the option to order professional human translation services and to use the Automatic Translation feature. But there are also features like the Translation Memory, which can considerably reduce the translation workload. Memorizing all your translations, including the deleted ones, the TM lets you recycle translations in your current and future localization projects, saving you valuable resources.

The file management can also be automated, with the GitHub, Bitbucket or GitLab integration.

POEditor integrations

You can track the localization progress with statistics per language and per contributor. You can also get real-time notifications about project activity with the help of our Realtime Translation System and our HipChat integration and Slack integration.

If you want to automate everything, check out the POEditor API.

When necessary, you can export the localized strings to any of the formats supported by POEditor, including .xtb. Do this from the language page, using the API, or with the help of one of the code hosting platform integrations.

POEditor localization API improvements

The POEditor dev team has been very busy lately, tinkering with the localization API (among others). Below are described the improvements you can find in API v2.

New API methods

Besides completely refreshing the look (structure) of the API, we’ve also completed it with a few methods. Now, we can say it better mirrors the functionalities in the localization interface.
  • Update terms. This is the equivalent of the View or Add Terms in the localization interface. It lets you change the text, context, reference, plural and tags.
  • Remove contributor. This method removes a contributor from a project language or an admin from a project, if the language is not specified.
  • Delete projectIt deletes the project from the account. You must be the owner of the project.
  • Update project settings. The method lets you set or delete a Default Reference Language, as well as edit the name and/or description of the project.

Other improvements

We’ve also updated some already existing methods in the localization API, as follows:
  • View Project Details now also shows the number of terms in the project.
  • List project terms supports plurals.
  • Update project language gained the fuzzy trigger (and can mark as fuzzy the translations in the other languages).

That’s all folks! We hope you enjoy API v2 and look forward to your feedback on it.

Translation orders from TextMaster, now an option within POEditor

Due to our users’ increasing demand for translation services, we decided to take the human translations feature a step further. Thus, we added TextMaster to our offer of professional translation service providers.

What TextMaster offers

Created in 2011 and headquartered in Belgium, TextMaster’s biggest point of difference is probably its specialization in European languages, including German, Italian, French, Portuguese, Spanish.

TextMaster’s network of professional translators and qualified native speakers is skilled in adapting your content to local audiences in more than 50 languages and over 200 language pairs. 

You can choose between two pricing tiers, Standard and Enterprise, priced per-word from $0.066 and $0.132 respectively.

The Standard level is handled by tested native speakers, and is best for simple translations of short texts, that do not have specialized vocabulary. The Enterprise level is handled by experienced professional translators, and is suited for professional translation projects that require a translator with full-time availability.

Ordering Translation Services

If you’ve ordered translation services from your POEditor account before, rest assured that not much has changed regarding the ordering process.

To order translations, you should:

1. Log in to your POEditor account

2. Go to your localization project and click on Translation Orders in the right-hand Options Menu

3. Select the desired values and request a quote from the available translation service providers

4. Choose the quote which best suits your needs and place the order.

You can find a more detailed guide on how to order translations here.

Select translation service provider - POEditor localization tool

We hope that we now have a more complete and flexible solution for our users for human translation. If you have any questions regarding the human translation module, feel free to drop us a line.

POEditor and WPML team up to help you translate WordPress sites & plugins

Translate WordPress with POEditor and WPML

We’re happy to announce that POEditor is now integrated with WPML, one of the most popular plugins to translate WordPress sites. In case you’re not familiar with WPML, what you should know is that it lets you write content in different languages and translate the existing content of your WP site. But content is not the only thing it can help translate.

How POEditor helps WPML users

WPML is also useful for theme and plugin translation, by extracting the strings in your WordPress language files and sending them to a platform where they can be translated. POEditor is such a translation management platform, where you can bring your translation team members to collaborate. They don’t even need a WordPress account to participate! Just add them to your POEditor translation project using their email address and that’s it.

How to connect WPML to POEditor

A detailed guide for connecting WPML and POEditor you can find here. The guide also describes how to send the strings you want to translate from your site to your POEditor translation project.

What translation options do I have with POEditor?

To translate WordPress sites and plugins with us, you can choose between one or more of the following methods:

  1. Crowdsourcing translations from your community (using public projects)
  2. Using your own translators (by adding them as contributors)
  3. Using Machine Translation
  4. Ordering translations from one of our partners

According to your resources and needs, you can combine the available translation options in whatever way suits you best.

We believe the integration with the WPML translation plugin nicely complements our WordPress translation plugin. With the POEditor plugin, you can translate WordPress strings efficiently. But with WPML, you can also manage the translation of WordPress content as well, all from your WP dashboard.

Translate your app or website faster with multiple human translation orders

POEditor users have multiple options for translating their software strings. They can bring their own translators, crowdsource translations using public projects, use machine translation engines, or even opt for third party human translation services. The latter feature is provided in partnership with well-reputed human translation platforms in the industry.

Until recently, as a POEditor user, you had to access each localization project to order human translations for it. And you had to repeat this process for each language. Because our users made us aware they wish to accelerate this part of their workflow, we’ve made some small changes.

What’s new with the human translation order process

In essence, you can now place orders for any project in the same page, and can order as many translations as you want, at the same time.

Add human translation order - POEditor localization platform

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Automating your localization workflow with POEditor API – Quick Guide

Whenever you get the chance to automate something to avoid repetitive manual work, go for it, because it will save you a lot of time and boost your productivity. That being said, let’s cut to the chase: the purpose of this article is to show you how to automate your localization workflow with the POEditor API. For this, we’ll go through a simple step by step guide. You’ll learn how to send your language data to POEditor and how to pull the translated work back into your software.

Knowledge of a programming language is required (any will do), but we’ll focus on the requests you need to make to the API.

All the information about the API is in the API Reference.

Before starting the actual work, get an API token from your POEditor account. You can find it in Account Settings > API Access.

Project setup

The first step is to create a project. Note that you need to do this only once and that you can also use the interface. It’s probably faster anyway.

Create a project:

curl -X POST https://poeditor.com/api/ \
-d api_token="e9eccebeccfr9wed638eb35f5e2d5600" \
-d action="create_project" \
-d name="Quick Guide"

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Machine translation in app and website localization

We can trace the idea of Machine Translation back to the 17th century, in the work of René Descartes. But it’s the 1970s which saw Machine Translation used for its actual purpose, initially in institutions like the European Commission, and later at big corporations. The advent of the Internet sped up the evolution of MT significantly and resulted in advanced technologies like today’s Statistical Machine Translation.

In software localization, we can use Machine Translation (or Automatic Translation) in a number of processes.

Google and Bing machine translation engines for automatic translation- POEdtior localization platform
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Free localization with the POEditor translation platform

The online localization platform POEditor is free to use to translate software projects collaboratively in the following circumstances:

With Free Accounts

If you register to the POEditor, you get an account with a Free plan by default. The free account can accomodate software localization projects summing up to 1000 strings, which is usually enough to translate a small app or a WordPress theme into a few languages.

Also, you can use your free account to contribute without any limitation to localization projects owned by other users. The strings you translate for others are counted against their account.

Free plans, like all the other POEditor plans, can host an unlimited number of projects, languages and contributors. But, unlike accounts with paid plans, free accounts don’t come with a Translation Memory feature.
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