Translation orders from TextMaster, now an option within POEditor

Due to our users’ increasing demand for translation services, we decided to take the human translations feature a step further. Thus, we added TextMaster to our offer of professional translation service providers.

What TextMaster offers

Created in 2011 and headquartered in Belgium, TextMaster’s biggest point of difference is probably its specialization in European languages, including German, Italian, French, Portuguese, Spanish.

TextMaster’s network of professional translators and qualified native speakers is skilled in adapting your content to local audiences in more than 50 languages and over 200 language pairs. 

You can choose between two pricing tiers, Standard and Enterprise, priced per-word from $0.066 and $0.132 respectively.

The Standard level is handled by tested native speakers, and is best for simple translations of short texts, that do not have specialized vocabulary. The Enterprise level is handled by experienced professional translators, and is suited for professional translation projects that require a translator with full-time availability.

Ordering Translation Services

If you’ve ordered translation services from your POEditor account before, rest assured that not much has changed regarding the ordering process.

To order translations, you should:

1. Log in to your POEditor account

2. Go to your localization project and click on Translation Orders in the right-hand Options Menu

3. Select the desired values and request a quote from the available translation service providers

4. Choose the quote which best suits your needs and place the order.

You can find a more detailed guide on how to order translations here.

Select translation service provider - POEditor localization tool

We hope that we now have a more complete and flexible solution for our users for human translation. If you have any questions regarding the human translation module, feel free to drop us a line.

POEditor and WPML team up to help you translate WordPress sites & plugins

Translate WordPress with POEditor and WPML

We’re happy to announce that POEditor is now integrated with WPML, one of the most popular plugins to translate WordPress sites. In case you’re not familiar with WPML, what you should know is that it lets you write content in different languages and translate the existing content of your WP site. But content is not the only thing it can help translate.

How POEditor helps WPML users

WPML is also useful for theme and plugin translation, by extracting the strings in your WordPress language files and sending them to a platform where they can be translated. POEditor is such a translation management platform, where you can bring your translation team members to collaborate. They don’t even need a WordPress account to participate! Just add them to your POEditor translation project using their email address and that’s it.

How to connect WPML to POEditor

A detailed guide for connecting WPML and POEditor you can find here. The guide also describes how to send the strings you want to translate from your site to your POEditor translation project.

What translation options do I have with POEditor?

To translate WordPress sites and plugins with us, you can choose between one or more of the following methods:

  1. Crowdourcing translations from your community (using public projects)
  2. Using your own translators (by adding them as contributors)
  3. Using Machine Translation
  4. Ordering translations from one of our partners

According to your resources and needs, you can combine the available translation options in whatever way suits you best.

We believe the integration with the WPML translation plugin nicely complements our WordPress translation plugin. With the POEditor plugin, you can translate WordPress strings efficiently. But with WPML, you can also manage the translation of WordPress content as well, all from your WP dashboard.

Translate your app or website faster with multiple human translation orders

POEditor users have multiple options for translating their software strings. They can bring their own translators, crowdsource translations using public projects, use machine translation engines, or even opt for third party human translation services. The latter feature is provided in partnership with well-reputed human translation platforms in the industry.

Until recently, as a POEditor user, you had to access each localization project to order human translations for it. And you had to repeat this process for each language. Because our users made us aware they wish to accelerate this part of their workflow, we’ve made some small changes.

What’s new with the human translation order process

In essence, you can now place orders for any project in the same page, and can order as many translations as you want, at the same time.

Add human translation order - POEditor localization platform

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Automating your localization workflow with POEditor API – Quick Guide

Whenever you get the chance to automate something to avoid repetitive manual work, go for it, because it will save you a lot of time and boost your productivity. That being said, let’s cut to the chase: the purpose of this article is to show you how to automate your localization workflow with the POEditor API. For this, we’ll go through a simple step by step guide. You’ll learn how to send your language data to POEditor and how to pull the translated work back into your software.

Knowledge of a programming language is required (any will do), but we’ll focus on the requests you need to make to the API.

All the information about the API is in the API Reference.

Before starting the actual work, get an API token from your POEditor account. You can find it in Account Settings > API Access.

Project setup

The first step is to create a project. Note that you need to do this only once and that you can also use the interface. It’s probably faster anyway.

Create a project:

curl -X POST https://poeditor.com/api/ \
-d api_token="e9eccebeccfr9wed638eb35f5e2d5600" \
-d action="create_project" \
-d name="Quick Guide"

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Machine translation in app and website localization

We can trace the idea of Machine Translation back to the 17th century, in the work of René Descartes. But it’s the 1970s which saw Machine Translation used for its actual purpose, initially in institutions like the European Commission, and later at big corporations. The advent of the Internet sped up the evolution of MT significantly and resulted in advanced technologies like today’s Statistical Machine Translation.

In software localization, we can use Machine Translation (or Automatic Translation) in a number of processes.

Google and Bing machine translation engines for automatic translation- POEdtior localization platform
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Free localization with the POEditor translation platform

The online localization platform POEditor is free to use to translate software projects collaboratively in the following circumstances:

With Free Accounts

If you register to the POEditor, you get an account with a Free plan by default. The free account can accomodate software localization projects summing up to 1000 strings, which is usually enough to translate a small app or a WordPress theme into a few languages.

Also, you can use your free account to contribute without any limitation to localization projects owned by other users. The strings you translate for others are counted against their account.

Free plans, like all the other POEditor plans, can host an unlimited number of projects, languages and contributors. But, unlike accounts with paid plans, free accounts don’t come with a Translation Memory feature.
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Crowdsourcing translation for a software localization project: how to manage everything

So there’s a software product you want to localize into some languages, and you decided on crowdsourcing translation to achieve this.

If you’re working with any of these localization files, you can easily set up a crowdsourcing project at POEditor. Just create an account, and you’ll have access immediately to awesome localization management features that will automate your workflow like never before.

This article is an overview of the steps to creating a crowdsourced translation project and the essential features to manage it.

A public join page for crowdsourcing translators - POEditor localization platform
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Translator’s guide to software localization

If you want to help with the localization of a software product using the POEditor translation platform, but you’re not quite sure what you should do, you can browse this article to gain insights into how our collaborative interface works.

How to join a localization project

Joining depends on the project type. If the project is private, the project owner or an administrator must add you, and you’ll be informed by email of this. If it is a crowdsourced localization project, you’ll have to go to the public join page and select the language(s) you want to contribute to.

Join public localization project - POEditor translation management platform
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How to integrate Slack or HipChat into your software localization workflow

Connectivity is essential to a flexibile and efficient localization workflow. Being connected to your team at all times and also being connected to the constant flow of events during the localization process, you can react on the spot whenever something needs attention, increasing productivity and saving a lot of resources on the way. With this in mind, and somehow as a logical step to offering you a better solution for collaborative localization, we’ve decided to add two more options to the list of integrations available with the POEditor localization management platform- Slack and HipChat.

The walkthroughs below will help you connect your POEditor account to Slack or to HipChat. Make sure you log in both to the POEditor localization platform and to your preferred communication service before you begin.
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